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Archipp Guschin
Archipp Guschin

Oxygen Xml Editor 12 2 Crack __TOP__ 3


It supports IntelliSense for code completion and syntax errors. XPath expressions and XInclude are also included. The editor has good performance on large XML documents and has real-time XML schema validation. The editor also features an HTML viewer for viewing XSLT transformation output.




Oxygen Xml Editor 12 2 Crack 3



Liquid XML Studio IDE is a Windows-based XML editor and XML data binding toolkit. It features Graphical XML Schema Editor, Graphical JSON Schema Editor, Graphical XML editor, and DTD editor. It also includes a user interface extension to Microsoft Visual Studio through the Visual Studio Industry Partner (VSIP) program.


The Kate source code editor features debug window, file explorer, and plugins. KTextEditor for editing color themes as provided by KSyntaxHighlighting. It has an option for viewing HTML sources, editing configuration files, and doing development tasks.


It has got beginners friendly structured views for nodes and attributes of XML data. It also provides easy embedding of Youtube videos, CSS3, markdown, and supports media files. It can also be used as a PDF editor by transforming XML to DITA content, which can be rendered as a PDF.


XMLSpy is primarily marketed as a JSON and XML Editor. It has a built-in schema designer and editor. It includes Visual Studio And Eclipse integration. It has an XPath builder, validator, evaluator, and debugger.


Editix is a quality open-source XML editor with lots of features like XSLT Editor, Debugger, XQuery editor, grid editor, visual Schema Editor, and a lot more. The primary interface of this Editor is the global view. The manual is available here with screenshots.


Various collaborative online encyclopedias were attempted before the start of Wikipedia, but with limited success.[24] Wikipedia began as a complementary project for Nupedia, a free online English-language encyclopedia project whose articles were written by experts and reviewed under a formal process.[25] It was founded on March 9, 2000, under the ownership of Bomis, a web portal company. Its main figures were Bomis CEO Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger, editor-in-chief for Nupedia and later Wikipedia.[1][26] Nupedia was initially licensed under its own Nupedia Open Content License, but before Wikipedia was founded, Nupedia switched to the GNU Free Documentation License at the urging of Richard Stallman.[27] Wales is credited with defining the goal of making a publicly editable encyclopedia,[28][29] while Sanger is credited with the strategy of using a wiki to reach that goal.[30] On January 10, 2001, Sanger proposed on the Nupedia mailing list to create a wiki as a "feeder" project for Nupedia.[31]


In November 2009, a researcher at the Rey Juan Carlos University in Madrid, Spain found that the English Wikipedia had lost 49,000 editors during the first three months of 2009; in comparison, it lost only 4,900 editors during the same period in 2008.[51][52] The Wall Street Journal cited the array of rules applied to editing and disputes related to such content among the reasons for this trend.[53] Wales disputed these claims in 2009, denying the decline and questioning the study's methodology.[54] Two years later, in 2011, he acknowledged a slight decline, noting a decrease from "a little more than 36,000 writers" in June 2010 to 35,800 in June 2011. In the same interview, he also claimed the number of editors was "stable and sustainable".[55] A 2013 MIT Technology Review article, "The Decline of Wikipedia", questioned this claim, revealing that since 2007, Wikipedia had lost a third of its volunteer editors, and that those remaining had focused increasingly on minutiae.[56] In July 2012, The Atlantic reported that the number of administrators was also in decline.[57] In the November 25, 2013, issue of New York magazine, Katherine Ward stated, "Wikipedia, the sixth-most-used website, is facing an internal crisis."[58]


On January 18, 2023, Wikipedia debuted a new website redesign, called 'Vector 2022".[80][81] It featured a redesigned menu bar, moving the table of contents to the left as a sidebar, and numerous changes in the locations of buttons like the language selection tool.[81][82] The update initially received backlash, most notably when editors of the Swahili Wikipedia unanimously voted to revert the changes.[80][83]


Due to Wikipedia's increasing popularity, some editions, including the English version, have introduced editing restrictions for certain cases. For instance, on the English Wikipedia and some other language editions, only registered users may create a new article.[85] On the English Wikipedia, among others, particularly controversial, sensitive, or vandalism-prone pages have been protected to varying degrees.[86][87] A frequently vandalized article can be "semi-protected" or "extended confirmed protected", meaning that only "autoconfirmed" or "extended confirmed" editors can modify it.[88] A particularly contentious article may be locked so that only administrators can make changes.[89] A 2021 article in the Columbia Journalism Review identified Wikipedia's page-protection policies as "perhaps the most important" means at its disposal to "regulate its market of ideas".[90]


In certain cases, all editors are allowed to submit modifications, but review is required for some editors, depending on certain conditions. For example, the German Wikipedia maintains "stable versions" of articles which have passed certain reviews.[91] Following protracted trials and community discussion, the English Wikipedia introduced the "pending changes" system in December 2012.[92] Under this system, new and unregistered users' edits to certain controversial or vandalism-prone articles are reviewed by established users before they are published.[93]


Any change or edit that manipulates content in a way that deliberately compromises Wikipedia's integrity is considered vandalism. The most common and obvious types of vandalism include additions of obscenities and crude humor; it can also include advertising and other types of spam.[98] Sometimes editors commit vandalism by removing content or entirely blanking a given page. Less common types of vandalism, such as the deliberate addition of plausible but false information, can be more difficult to detect. Vandals can introduce irrelevant formatting, modify page semantics such as the page's title or categorization, manipulate the article's underlying code, or use images disruptively.[99]


In the Seigenthaler biography incident, an anonymous editor introduced false information into the biography of American political figure John Seigenthaler in May 2005, falsely presenting him as a suspect in the assassination of John F. Kennedy.[102] It remained uncorrected for four months.[102] Seigenthaler, the founding editorial director of USA Today and founder of the Freedom Forum First Amendment Center at Vanderbilt University, called Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales and asked whether he had any way of knowing who contributed the misinformation. Wales said he did not, although the perpetrator was eventually traced.[103][104] After the incident, Seigenthaler described Wikipedia as "a flawed and irresponsible research tool".[102] The incident led to policy changes at Wikipedia for tightening up the verifiability of biographical articles of living people.[105]


The editorial principles of the Wikipedia community are embodied in the "Five pillars" and in numerous policies and guidelines intended to appropriately shape content.[119] The rules developed by the community are stored in wiki form, and Wikipedia editors write and revise the website's policies and guidelines.[120] Editors can enforce the rules by deleting or modifying non-compliant material.[121] Originally, rules on the non-English editions of Wikipedia were based on a translation of the rules for the English Wikipedia. They have since diverged to some extent.[91]


According to the rules on the English Wikipedia community, each entry in Wikipedia must be about a topic that is encyclopedic and is not a dictionary entry or dictionary-style.[122] A topic should also meet Wikipedia's standards of "notability", which generally means that the topic must have been covered in mainstream media or major academic journal sources that are independent of the article's subject.[123] Further, Wikipedia intends to convey only knowledge that is already established and recognized.[124] It must not present original research.[125] A claim that is likely to be challenged requires a reference to a reliable source, as do all quotations.[122] Among Wikipedia editors, this is often phrased as "verifiability, not truth" to express the idea that the readers, not the encyclopedia, are ultimately responsible for checking the truthfulness of the articles and making their own interpretations.[126] This can at times lead to the removal of information that, though valid, is not properly sourced.[127] Finally, Wikipedia must not take sides.[128]


Wikipedia's initial anarchy integrated democratic and hierarchical elements over time.[129][130] An article is not considered to be owned by its creator or any other editor, nor by the subject of the article.[131]


Editors in good standing in the community can request extra user rights, granting them the technical ability to perform certain special actions. In particular, editors can choose to run for "adminship",[132] which includes the ability to delete pages or prevent them from being changed in cases of severe vandalism or editorial disputes.[133] Administrators are not supposed to enjoy any special privilege in decision-making; instead, their powers are mostly limited to making edits that have project-wide effects and thus are disallowed to ordinary editors, and to implement restrictions intended to prevent disruptive editors from making unprod


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